We’re All Works of Art

by By Mark Sperring
Illustrated by Rose Blake

We’re All Works of Art is a clever and uplifting book that teaches the reader that each of us is unique and one of a kind. “We might look like a collage, made up of this and that. But we wouldn’t change a mismatched ear, or swap one single scrap.” The message is simple, but illustrated beautifully in a way that both parents and children will enjoy.

We’re All Works of Art communicates its message of self-acceptance through art history so that, in addition to reinforcing individuality, the illustrations enhance the readers competence. The book in itself is also an art history lesson with each page of the rhyming text illustrated by a different art style. For example, the book begins with Cubism, moves into Pop Art and Surrealism and continues with Egyptian art, Greek art, Indian miniatures, Renaissance art, Fauvism, Cubism and Contemporary art. At the end, the book invites the reader to make his or her own masterpiece: paint a picture or mold with clay.

In addition to the diversity of art styles illustrated throughout the book, We’re All Works of Art does a good job of showing different kinds and colors of people throughout the book, but often avoids the problem by simply featuring art in which the dualism is irrelevant. One spread, for example, features women’s faces that are blue, red, orange, lavender, pink and green. Another features people with oranges as heads. Even when people are shown outside of an art piece, as in the museum spread, they are fairly diverse and feature a black family, a white family, a brown family, grandparents, and an older person with a disability.

We’re All Works of Art  teaches on several levels. It not only tells the readers that it is good to be unique, but also illustrates the power of uniqueness with examples of diverse art styles. It’s a brilliant concept and well executed. “Think how dull the world would be if we were all the same…Join us in a celebration of all the angles, swirls, and scribbly lines that make each and every one of us a work of art.”

  • Fosters emotional and social development - 90%
    90%
  • Has a clear message – explicit or implicit - 100%
    100%
  • Helps children to understand their emotional experience - 80%
    80%
  • Developmentally appropriate - 90%
    90%
  • Captivating for children and their imagination - 80%
    80%
  • Supports loving relationships - 80%
    80%
  • Promotes laughter - 90%
    90%
  • Encourages creative play - 100%
    100%
  • Is inventive - 100%
    100%
  • Promotes diversity - 100%
    100%
  • How likely would you be to recommend this book - 100%
    100%

2 Comments

  1. Peggy O'Mara
    Peggy O'Mara
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    Tessa McMahon